Tag Archives: wildlife

River filming and solitary bees

Took the camera down to get some river shots to add to the doc which was rather refreshing. On my way down the road I also thought I could include the bones that the eagles incessantly drop and eat the marrow from the scattered remnants of old and sick goats that died on their last “paseo” across the vast Mijas mountain ranges.

bones on roof from eagle

I have never found out which are the ones that do such a thing, what a shot that would make! Many raptors do this: gaining access to the nutritious marrow which is often the only scraps left from an otherwise arid landscape. Also some scenes of a rather impressive algarroba tree.

Algarrobo tree

By the time I got the river, it was still rather stifling hot at 6pm, so I rapped up with a couple of river scenes and did a piece to camera on solitary bees. Originally I was going to one on ants, but seeing that they moved around at an impossible speed, I decided an over-worked bee would be slightly easier but no less interesting. The poor insect clearly had seen better days, it had literally worked itself into this state, as a solitary worker bee.

Me presenting bee

Most people have the perception that these ancient insects are primarily social, however, over 90% are solitary bees! The females will find crevices and cracks to construct underground nests, where they will lay their eggs. The food provided to the offspring in the form of pollen and nectar (the only diet of the bee’s having evolved down a different dietary route from their carnivorous ancestors, wasps). This food is gathered, but after no care is given after laying the eggs- unlike in the social colonies. The three social groups include bumble bees, honey bees and the stingless bees. They all exhibit eusocial behaviour, that is, they show the highest level of organization of animal sociality,  defined by cooperative brood care (including brood care of offspring from other individuals), overlapping generations within a colony of adults, and a division of labour into reproductive and non-reproductive groups. The division of labour creates specialized behavioural groups within an animal society which are sometimes called castes . Eusociality is distinguished from all other social systems because individuals of at least one caste usually lose the ability to perform at least one behaviour characteristic of individuals in another caste.

bee 2

I noticed that the goat farmer had marked out all of his land with a pathetic little fence, and in doing so, taking a bit of our own land in the process. He was growing some rather withered looking melons and other unidentifiable crops. What a waste of land!

goat farmers farm, melon shot

He had entirely destroyed the back of the river, along with it all the vital berry bushes and habitat for nesting birds such as the stunning Nightingale and ground nesting birds such as they grey partridge. I actually heard a partridge on my way back up, no luck in seeing it though. All in all, quite a fun experience and got some good footage to edit, it’s a wrap!

 

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Bee-eaters, kestrels and Short-toed eagles

July 11th

It’s been a week since I landed at Malaga International airport, and I already have a partial tan. Aside from my melatonin functioning properly, I was jubilant and positively excited by the sight of my two beautiful short-toed eagles about 7pm yesterday evening. I was beginning to think that they had not migrated back over to the same territory! The large female was nowhere to be seen, only the two smaller previous juveniles. They have indeed grown! Both were gliding above the thermals up along the North-Western edge of the valley, then sauntered a little closer above the pine tree so I was lucky enough to get a shot of them.

IMG_1041

The kestrel has also been around, raucously kkkiwwkiiwwkiiwing away at any aerial and terrestrial intruder than he may come into contact with. I only just heard the bee-eaters last night too; began to think they had been scared by the goat farmer who had just recently set up his farm near our log cabin- what a jerk. Seriously, I understand it’s his land, but to scare away an entire bird colony which had previously nested in the bank there is most frustrating. I do also believe that in the mornings I can hear the magnificently resplendent Golden oriole trill out its beautiful melody. It’s been 2 years since I heard its sweet and pleasing song. An occasional kwaaakiii will also emanate from the reeds down in the valley- a warning call that is extraordinarily similar to the call of a kestrel. At ground level I’ve also encountered some rather fascinating insects, a coleopteran and some sort of lacewing or mantis? Was a really lovely hike to my favourite spot on the mountain, I remember well those times that I came up to get some rest bite from all the studying; to clear my head of worries. Some of my best poetry came from this spot! Although I most probably thought it was, see what you think of them at the end of this entry! (Bear in mind, I was about 14!).

Also great to read for fun again; something that did not actually happen or exists as a theory! What a relief. Got through most of it, will be reading David Aric’s “African Pursuit” later on, a really elaborately written masterpiece, and I have to admit it does have accurate geological and historical references to it. Couldn’t leave that out entirely. Football Fever still around here, even though Spain lost out big style, it wasn’t bad as Brazil’s 7-1 loss. Argentina Vs Germany final, must say that Germany do definitely deserve to be there, they placed a superlative match on Wednesday. Will be watching it at a friend’s BBQ on Sunday. Boy oh boy do I miss English doc’s and television. Spanish television (no offence to my half and other Spanish,) is 60% adverts, 20% dancing and singing host and 20% spoof comedies on what’s happened during the day with rather obnoxious music and dramatic voice overs. I mean to be fair I’m not actually watching any or would be during the day when I’m out at the beach, but during the evening I might as well sleep or read! The beach has been lovely, not had the courage to swim yet, a tad bit cold for my liking (I say this and its 32 degrees). But nonetheless. On now is actually a really interesting doc about Seville and its natural wonders, so I’m off to watch that, might give me inspiration for some sequences shots for tomorrow, I think I should perhaps stop panning everywhere! Also after the playback, the sound of the lens autofocusing and reducing the vibrations is rather annoying. Tomorrow I will be doing some more filming down by the river and maybe some swimming; see what the temperature is like. Will also plan the trip to Nerja which I’m very excited about! More about this most stunning of European Caves later on. I will also be planning a trip to Gibraltar, home to Europe’s only known wild apes (other than the holiday makers of course), as well as to an UNESCO world heritage site; Donana national park.- home of the elusive lynx! The coach tickets are fairly cheap so shouldn’t be a problem. Bueno, buenas noches!

The cheetah

Golden blades wave,

with the wind,

the smells of wild Africa

draw ever nearer.

A tawny dull coat

emerges from

the sea of grass,

then disappears

on the spot.

The Thompsons gazelle,

graceful grazes

by the Hullabaloo waterhole

with not a stir.

Head flashes up,

ears and nose twitching

for the hunter is

The birds fall silent,

the Kudu glare

for the mighty hunter is well aware.

A spotted blur

as the cheetah chases,

the gazelle flees,

against the kudu, races

but the Cheetah has

locked its prey;

tail as the rudder,

steering ever closer

to its prey,

ultimate speed

some might say.

Paw lunges out

catching the hoof,

with a tremendous pought

the jaws come clamping

around the throat,

the trickle of blood

that makes the tear stripe.

This is the Cheetah,

the fastest cat on the plain

the most streamline and acute

with a slender frame.

By:  Tania. Rose. Esteban   10s

The Spanish Imperial Eagle

He glides, cavorts,

He turns and acutes a position,

He sees nothing, blatantly swerves,

The acrobat that he is;

Dives, shoots towards gravities pull; prey.

Lost; glides in a gradient towards the heavens,

gains height in fluctuations.

He is a gliding angel, across the moors

never stopping at a first glimpse,

of the target, his target.

A tinge of lavender, a splash of mauve

as he perches, claw on prey

he lands precariously on granite.

It is hard, but cooling

as is the victim within claws,

Lifeless; as so the moor seems

but not for the Spirit,

Shadowing our realms.

By:     Tania. Rose. Esteban   10s

Interview with Dr George Mc Gavin

Dr George McGavin interview about new BBC series, Monkey Planet!

​February 15th, 2014

george

I had a very special guest interview with entomologist, lecturer writer, presenter and intrepid explorer Dr George McGavin! Was so excited to be able to speak to him as a huge fan of all his”Lost Land Series,” The Dark and Prehistoric autopsy. I had a bit of a hiccup when calling him via skype, as our sound system wasnt working and we couldn´t hear him! Thankfully our station manager saved the day and fixed the problem! We chatted about his two new series coming out soon, one next week about dissection on BBC 4 where we can “get up close and personal” with the human body and a very exciting 3 part series on Primates called Monkey planet that he was particularly excited about. He tells me about dissected and the incredibly talented Tom Yendell who paints with his feet and the incredible dexterity of the human hand in climbers. It´s rather good timing too as in animal physiology class I had to dissect a chicken the day after! I admit, it is pretty gory at first, but when you see how remarkble the internal organs, capilliaries, veins, muscle, bones and brain are, you begin to appreciate how complex life is. For his incredible Monkey Planet series, he travelled to Japan, to the Jigokundani Yaen-Koen monkey park to meet some rather precocious and pampered primatesand then to Thailand to meet another group who become particularly fond of his hair! He takes a look at the remarkable lives of primates (the prosimians and simians). Make sure you tune in to watch Monkey Planet on BBC one airing in April, its got some remarkable behaviour that has never been filmed before which is unbelievably exciting so we will keep everyone in Leeds posted on our website that and your fascinating two part series on Dissection starts next week so make sure you watch it!