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Almscliff Adventures: Begginners guide to Rock Climbing

 Almscliff crag walk

Almscliff Crag is located between the verdant green sloping hills of Harrogate and the bustling city of Leeds, and protrudes on top of a small hill. Made of Millstone grit, it optimizes the hardiness of the great Yorkshire people- tough and gritty is most certainly the way up North! It was formed out of the destruction of the surrounding softer and more fragile shale and mudstone strata, which left this hardier famous landmark which is extremely popular with walkers and climbers alike. I headed up with the Leeds University Mountaineering society (Climbing) to try out my first outdoor climb, having had several indoor and seemingly difficult routes indoors at the Depot (Pudsey) and The Edge (Leeds). I could only really manage the Blues and Black holds at that point, so wasn’t too sure what to expect on an outdoor trip! But I was rearing to go and try it out.

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Beautiful views of Otley and the Chevin from the top of the Almscliff crag.

Ed and Dan were my teachers and were incredibly patient with my incompetent movements that resembled a seagull with broken wings that had been coated with tar… rather flailing!

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But you learn fast, it literally is a steep learning curve, with all the different names for pieces of kit, it can be a bit overwhelming! Firstly, rock climbing involves two people or a small group including the use of ropes which can either be done indoors at a local climbing centre OR outdoors. Other types of climbing without ropes involves bouldering where crash mats are places strategically in order to prevent any accidents. This is usually done in indoor centres without rope as the crash mats provide sufficient padding to cushion a fall whilst you build up your strength and stamina, to prepare you for an outdoor climb. You can use ropes indoors where another person is strapped into a harness and tied up whilst one person belays you- basically pulling up the slack rope as you climb ever higher and ready to catch you if you slip and fall. The different types of climbing are:

# 1 Traditional (or trad if you want to sound cool and mingle with climbers, ALWAYS use colloquial language to get in with the climbers!). This is where one climber will “lead” up along the rock face and place in all the bolts, cams and screws through which the rope will be placed through. This not only keeps the lead and first climber safe but allows the second climber to follow. Then at the top an anchor is built and three ropes are attached with into the rock with hexes (you will see why, they resemble hexagonal metal pieces) and then attach yourself to them by the rope with a special type of knot know as a clove hitch. The second climber will follow up after the first has yelled “OFF BELAY, FREE TO CLIMB” and they have secured the ropes up at the top. The second climber will also remove the gear as they progress.

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(Left) Your nuts, bolts, cams and clip ons to keep you safe! All of this should be provided with your climbing society. (Bottom) Nick Belaying Fergus, (Bottom Right) Nick being lowered by the belayer, Ed who is at the top.

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# 2 Sport climbing is where climbers clip onto already placed bolts that are securely fixed into the rock for people to ascend. This is the much easier and quick way to climb, but not as exciting as leading a climb.

#3 Soloing is where climbers will ascend under their own steam without any rope and by themselves, DON’T TRY THIS FIRST!! It can be very risky going it alone, so make sure you have many months of experience before you try this out. Ed, (see below) has done this for years and so is experienced enough to know the risks.

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Ed soloing it up the Chimney

#3 Ice climbing involves, as the name suggests, ice or snow with use of particular equipment such as ice picks (who doesn’t want those awesome looking pick axes?) as well as crampons, boots, thermals, rope and harness. This isn’t for the faint hearted, not only are the cold conditions tough, but the technique is better off perfected indoors before you go out there, but it looks beautiful.

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# 4 Competition climbing is more competitive climbing primarily done indoors in climbing walls, check out these amazing videos of insanely good comp climbers!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Qk-lNsRtwQ

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# 5 Bouldering is as I mentioned earlier without ropes, and is frequently performed indoors with different coloured holds which indicates their level of difficulty. Hand Jamming, crimps are all part of the technical lingo…watch out for the Climbers chat guide coming soon!

IMG_5325Here is Fergus Bouldering up Manhorn…quite a long way down so crash mats were used! I was going to do this but then again….

Here are the essential basics to Traditional climbing:

#1: Belay Kit– can be bought in many outdoor stores, I personally bought mine at GO Outdoors as you can get a £5 discount card which will save you a whole load, and my gorgeous black and orange harness as well as purple screw gate (to clip rope through) and orange belay device (where the climbers rope is threaded through and to control the climbers ascent/descent). This will usually set you back £50 with all of the above and a chalk bag for when you get sweaty palms! If you have a bit more cash to splash, you could probably get a harness for £46 alone then buy the rest of the gear separately. Check this Climbex one similar to the one I got on Go Outdoors.co.uk:

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http://www.gooutdoors.co.uk/climb-x-pilot-harness-set-p194186

#2 Climbing shoes- I can’t stress how IMPORTANT SHOES are… always get a size above your normal shoes size, as they can be quite tight! It is supposed to be just uncomfortable so that you can really grip the rock face and have the friction to push up against gravity and the wall. Also you want them to be super comfy!

http://www.gooutdoors.co.uk/climb-x-crux-climbing-shoe-p194484

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#3 Chalk– is placed into you bag and attached to the back of your harness, used to stop those sweaty palms of yours when you’re up high from sweating up and losing grip!

The cheapest and best way to start climbing is to join your local university club and pay the membership there: your covered for insurance purposes and can borrow all the gear for a small £30 a year…think how much you will be saving if you don’t have to buy all that rope, harness, shoes, cams, nuts, clip ons, ect!

It’s also a great way to make friends and get shown how to climb with a good technique. Most members would have been doing this sport for some time and are experienced. So don’t splash your cash on all these fancy pancy climbing courses all the time- although I learnt how to belay at the edge for £25, I could have learnt the exact same thing with the climbing society showing me. I did my first outdoor climb with them too.

IMG_0640Me checking out my harness, belay device and screw gate.

So back to Almscliff! Classic climbs include the Chimney which is categoriesd as very difficult and Wall of Horrors. But as a beginner I would highly recommend doing Stewpot and Easy man– I am seen here doing Stewpot, which I also led a climb for. The rock is lovely and firm here which is reassuring, but it really makes you move your body in a way that makes you a more cautious and perceptive person. You need to be aware of where you’re placing your feet at all times…if you get a bad foothold then finding an equally dodgy handhold is of no significance.

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TRUST in your strong powerful legs and push up always from them and straighten your body right from your feet, all the way through your legs, through your core and UP you go! Onto the next hand hold. I must say, when I first started climbing, I had my doubts whether or not I could do it. My arms are like spindly gibbon arms, not much muscle at all! My legs are strong with all the cardio I do, and I was assured that it’s your LEGS that are the key to climbing. Whilst climbing Stewpot, in one of the cracks my friend shouted out that he saw a bat! I had to come up as I must say I didn’t initially believe him! But indeed there was a small wrinkled up Pipestrelle, sat snuggly between the cracks. We wondered if he was dead but he stirred as soon as we took a photo of him. Hope he was alright. You need a special license to handle them so it’s best that we left it alone. One then route had been led for me and it was safe for me to climb, I tied up my harness and headed up.

It was a gorgeous warm and sunny day. 25ᵒC-perfect for climbing the warm baked rocks of Almscliff crag. The scenery is truly spectacular up there. You can see why it’s a popular haunt with climbers, ramblers, boulderers, painters and walkers. Prior to joining the group, on my way up from the side car park, I wandered the crag to get a couple of panorama shots, and found a whole host of insect wildlife there. Swallows dart up and down catching their ready packed meals that are equally agile and astute on the wing- talk about fast food!

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My climbing friends tried the much harder Chimney, and Nick and Fergus gritted their teeth, and push and pulled harder to get to the top after attempts to get past the notoriously difficult mid slab of millstone rock- gravity ALWAYS wins. Funnily enough as I am writing this I just watched the film Gravity last night, brilliantly composed and shot, but a rather pessimistic film! Its unnerving to see your climbing buddies take a fall, even when attached to rope that can take the weight of a ton. We shout out support down at the bottom to help spur them on.

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The sun was beginning to slide further down the clouds, providing the perfect opportunity for me to get a silhouetted head shot and create a double exposure- check it out!I was very happy with the results after a tinkle on Photoshop CS3, I will be posting up a video tutorial on how to do it shortly. I hereby name it “Fergus and the Ferns!” after the plant I used to create it and the guy posing for it!

fergus tree copy before crop

After a long and gorgeous afternoon of climbing and photography, it couldn’t have ended more perfectly. I OFFICIALLY have the climbers bug, despite the climbers calluses and cramps in your toes after wearing the tiny shoes, climbing really makes you feel alive and brings out the best in your abilities- it MAKES you have to believe and trust in your judgment and work as a team to help them through the climb.

“Nothing beats that feeling when you get your hand at the top of that rock…”

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Ilkley Moor

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A splash of mauve grey and lilac contrasts prominently against the verdant green fern fronds, the rarity of azure skies made the scene one of even more serene beauty and wonder. Ilkley Moor certainly deserves its place amongst the expanses of the Jurassic Coast and the Lake District as a Site of Specific Scientific Interest, situated snuggly between Keightley (that’s “Keethly” to a Yorkshire person) and Ilkley, West Yorkshire. It was formed during the Carboniferous period some 325 million years ago, back when the moor was seeped by southern bound rivers and channels- creating a steamy tropical swamp-somewhat different to today.

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The force of the water chiselled away at the rock and the deposited sediment was as a result of the incoming ebb and flow of the rather tormentous tides- certainly what the UK is rather famous for, with the second largest tidal range in the Bristol Channel! The highest being in the Bay of Fundy, Eastern Canada at Burntcoat Head, of 11.7 meters. The moor is now well above sea level at 405m. The sediment eventually under the compaction pressure and eons of time formed hard rock layers. All manners of geological forces tilted the strata creating a continuous rippling of fractures and crevasse within the rocks, which is what makes this place a popular haunt for climbers. Further north are Rocky Valley and Ilkley Quarry, near the remote and little known village of Ben Rhydding.

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During the last Ice age, the glacier that shaped the wharfe valley cleaved its way through, smoothing the valleys and depositing glacial debris in the form of millstone grit- rather acidic which is what creates this gorgeous little habitat with its heather and scarred rock faces.

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The famous millstone “Cow and Calf” rock formation located at the Ilkley quarry is certainly an impressive rocky outcrop, definitely one to have your photo taken on! It is so called rather quirkily, due to the rocks resembling rather lucidly, a cow and a calf…legend has it that there was once an even larger boulder that once resided next to the calf and its mother that was deemed to be a “bull” but sadly this was said to be quarried during the 19th century spa boom… shame, would have felt more like home!

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It was my first time on the moor and it certainly was a perfect day for a hike. Armed with my GoPro, 600D and Wainwrights sketch note book, I felt ready to capture the memories! I am sorry to say… but I did pick a little heather, please don’t arrest me Natural England!

This very hardy and resistant shrub coexists with a whole host of other perfectly adapted species such as bracken and wavy-hair grass. The three species heather include cross-leaves, Bell-heather and Ling, the latter being the most prolific. Bilberries are scattered amongst this delicious assortment of green and lilac which apparently makes for an equally delectable summer pie. The almost jewel-like quality of the cranberries gives a splash of red to the scene, and adds a little flavour and spice to the otherwise cooler palate of blues, purples and greens.

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I felt very fortunate to see the stunning Red Grouse that reside here, one was hidden amongst the heather, and decided that he wasn’t very happy with me trampling on his favourite foraging site, and defiantly leapt up whilst uttering “ughghghghgghghgghhhh!” It almost has a clacking quality to it. Nevertheless, I pressed on determined to get a shot of him from below, as to not scare him further. He seemed to relax and I got the shot! See what you think.

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A smaller family were foraging on seeds, heather, berries and small insects. You can appreciate how well camouflaged they are from a distance; it was only till I stumbled upon them on the trail that I noticed them. However, it seems that they unphased by a fell runner, so I crawled a little closer to them to get some more shots. The bees were whizzing around the lilac flowers adorning the heather like little crocheted accessories, the locals actually sell honey which is especially made from this particular flower- will have to try some! http://www.denholmegatehoney.co.uk/

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I even spotted a Lizards tail as it dived into a heather patch… I thought I was seeing things- reptiles living in the UK! There are many brilliant bird species such as the cuckoo, Hen Harriers, Hawks, Kestrels, Plovers and starlings. It’s really easy to visit this historical site, you can get the X84 bus up or the train to the town, then it’s only a 10 minute walk up to the Moor itself, which is marked out with its Cow and calf café as well as the actual rock. Here is a link to upcoming events; I certainly will be joining the bat and GPS one! http://www.ilkleymoor.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/foim_events_2014_web1.pdf

21st July Dolphin tour, Fuengirola

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Stepped foot on my first boat today! Finally decided to go on the boat trip with Costasol Cruceros, Fuengirola, to go and see wild dolphins, as well as sandfish, turtles and other cetaceans. I was feeling lucky that day and the weather forecast was pretty good (24-33 degrees), with calmish winds of less than 20km/hr. Got my tickets by the port and went with my sister and little niece towards the port, located near the Fuengirola markets (see map), feeling rather exited! Fuengirola is a large Spanish town located within the Costa Del sol, and stretches 8km along the densely populated coastline, hugging its well visited beaches.

Many come for the shopping, sun and Sangria (pardon the personification!) and there are market days on Tuesday, Saturday and Sunday where you can get all sorts, from fake Luis Viton an Gucci bags, to boohoo leggings, crystals, Beats headphones and Nike shorts. The boat itself was rather small, in total I it would fit around 60 people. I sat at the front of the hull, to be sure of getting the best photo! Met a really fascinating woman from London, who was immediately friendly and welcoming.

Apparently, she had been the previous week with no success, and had got her second ticket half price and wanted to try her luck again. She had also swam with wild dolphins in Egypt, with the permission of the locals who only permitted her to allow the dolphins to approach her. The Skipper was busy getting the anchor whilst the captain communicated on his radio, to what I presume were local fishermen, and the engine roared to life- we were off! The harbour itself was remarkably calm, but as we got further out, it was slightly choppy…

But it was great fun!

It really was interesting talking to the kind elderly lady, really well travelled and smart. I took some panoramic shots of the vast Mijas mountain ranges and the busy coast line as we sailed further out. Tiny dotted beach towels added a splash of colour to the otherwise arid time landscape. The sun was beginning to arch hiGHEr into the sky, and reflected brilliantly off the surface of the Mediterranean sea. Polarized sun glasses are definitely a good option, helps to cut out the reflections and see what lies beneath the waves.

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I noticed some other passengers had Canon cameras (naturally, the best!) On our way out I spotted a sand fish! I think I was the only one to spot it right beneath the boat, initially I thought it was a shark, but the guide asked me to describe it and corrected me. It had a dorsal fin and was grey-yellowish colour with a creamy underbelly, and roughly 1 metre long. *Just adding this in: apparently within this week, Spanish news reporters have documented sightings of a shark near Fuengirola, so perhaps I was not mistaken by the sighting! Feeling lucky, I kept scanning the waves for a small dorsal fin, everything to me, after a fishy encounter, seemed to be dolphin-like! I remembered how confident I became after about 40 minutes into the trip, then I had to open my big mouth and then I genuinely felt a little sea sick….

The woman was very reassuring though and kept me occupied by re-counting fascinating stories. I decided to try out my amazon.co.uk sea sick bands, which really worked! Try them yourself if you get a little queasy. They’re basically like arm bands but have pressure balls for the acupuncture points on your wrists. We eventually approached another boat with rather a lot of seagulls, eager to snatch up any discards. This, I was assured by the Captain, would bring in the Bottle-nosed dolphins who peered at the sea with his rather large “bins”. Then, to our astonishment after a reported sighting through the binoculars, a streamline shape rippled through the azure waters, revealing that notorious dolphin dorsal fin! We all gasped with excitement as the beautiful animal breeched once more, and we all furiously clicked away with our cameras. I did too but did not look through the lens (as you can probably make out from the photo below!) and wanted to watch this stunning creature with my own eyes.

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I am often torn between marvelling at the wonders of that natural world with just my eyes or from behind a camera. I think it’s something all photographers face and sometime, I feel it’s best to let your eyes to the focusing and your emotions be the sensor and memory card- you can capture moments in your in and heart forever by just observing the natural world. But nevertheless, I still snapped away! It breeched about 3 times, then another larger individual came up alongside the boat (6 metres away), and came out the water a little more. It was really breath-taking, seeing such a wild animal coming close to us. I remember going to Selwo Marina last summer to look at the captive dolphins, and it saddened me deeply to see how distressed they can get as well as develop stereotypical behaviour. However I did actually see two of them mate, so they did show some relatively normal behaviour at least. But nothing compares to seeing them in the wild, free of human intervention in terms of training them to do meaningless tricks for tourists to glee at. It is much more incredible to view them in their natural environment with less intervention from human activities. Then it just melted away into the waves, and disappeared as if it had never been there. It was a brief but nonetheless exciting encounter with a Bottlenose, however our time at sea was up and the boat turned back and speedily darted across the dark Prussian blue sea.

What a trip! On the way back I took some shots of the coast, spectacular views. It really was worth it for €15, roughly £13.30 for 1 hour 30 minutes (conversion rate at the present moment: 1.25). The name of the company is Costa Cruceros and the service was excellent. I admit, if you really want to get good sightings, Gibraltar is probably your best bet, you can even get sightings of Orca! But for first timers like me, it’s a brilliant, I would highly recommend this trip! Please leave any comments below if you want any tips on how to get there from the airport via train or coach, I would be happy to help!

 

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Bee-eaters, kestrels and Short-toed eagles

July 11th

It’s been a week since I landed at Malaga International airport, and I already have a partial tan. Aside from my melatonin functioning properly, I was jubilant and positively excited by the sight of my two beautiful short-toed eagles about 7pm yesterday evening. I was beginning to think that they had not migrated back over to the same territory! The large female was nowhere to be seen, only the two smaller previous juveniles. They have indeed grown! Both were gliding above the thermals up along the North-Western edge of the valley, then sauntered a little closer above the pine tree so I was lucky enough to get a shot of them.

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The kestrel has also been around, raucously kkkiwwkiiwwkiiwing away at any aerial and terrestrial intruder than he may come into contact with. I only just heard the bee-eaters last night too; began to think they had been scared by the goat farmer who had just recently set up his farm near our log cabin- what a jerk. Seriously, I understand it’s his land, but to scare away an entire bird colony which had previously nested in the bank there is most frustrating. I do also believe that in the mornings I can hear the magnificently resplendent Golden oriole trill out its beautiful melody. It’s been 2 years since I heard its sweet and pleasing song. An occasional kwaaakiii will also emanate from the reeds down in the valley- a warning call that is extraordinarily similar to the call of a kestrel. At ground level I’ve also encountered some rather fascinating insects, a coleopteran and some sort of lacewing or mantis? Was a really lovely hike to my favourite spot on the mountain, I remember well those times that I came up to get some rest bite from all the studying; to clear my head of worries. Some of my best poetry came from this spot! Although I most probably thought it was, see what you think of them at the end of this entry! (Bear in mind, I was about 14!).

Also great to read for fun again; something that did not actually happen or exists as a theory! What a relief. Got through most of it, will be reading David Aric’s “African Pursuit” later on, a really elaborately written masterpiece, and I have to admit it does have accurate geological and historical references to it. Couldn’t leave that out entirely. Football Fever still around here, even though Spain lost out big style, it wasn’t bad as Brazil’s 7-1 loss. Argentina Vs Germany final, must say that Germany do definitely deserve to be there, they placed a superlative match on Wednesday. Will be watching it at a friend’s BBQ on Sunday. Boy oh boy do I miss English doc’s and television. Spanish television (no offence to my half and other Spanish,) is 60% adverts, 20% dancing and singing host and 20% spoof comedies on what’s happened during the day with rather obnoxious music and dramatic voice overs. I mean to be fair I’m not actually watching any or would be during the day when I’m out at the beach, but during the evening I might as well sleep or read! The beach has been lovely, not had the courage to swim yet, a tad bit cold for my liking (I say this and its 32 degrees). But nonetheless. On now is actually a really interesting doc about Seville and its natural wonders, so I’m off to watch that, might give me inspiration for some sequences shots for tomorrow, I think I should perhaps stop panning everywhere! Also after the playback, the sound of the lens autofocusing and reducing the vibrations is rather annoying. Tomorrow I will be doing some more filming down by the river and maybe some swimming; see what the temperature is like. Will also plan the trip to Nerja which I’m very excited about! More about this most stunning of European Caves later on. I will also be planning a trip to Gibraltar, home to Europe’s only known wild apes (other than the holiday makers of course), as well as to an UNESCO world heritage site; Donana national park.- home of the elusive lynx! The coach tickets are fairly cheap so shouldn’t be a problem. Bueno, buenas noches!

The cheetah

Golden blades wave,

with the wind,

the smells of wild Africa

draw ever nearer.

A tawny dull coat

emerges from

the sea of grass,

then disappears

on the spot.

The Thompsons gazelle,

graceful grazes

by the Hullabaloo waterhole

with not a stir.

Head flashes up,

ears and nose twitching

for the hunter is

The birds fall silent,

the Kudu glare

for the mighty hunter is well aware.

A spotted blur

as the cheetah chases,

the gazelle flees,

against the kudu, races

but the Cheetah has

locked its prey;

tail as the rudder,

steering ever closer

to its prey,

ultimate speed

some might say.

Paw lunges out

catching the hoof,

with a tremendous pought

the jaws come clamping

around the throat,

the trickle of blood

that makes the tear stripe.

This is the Cheetah,

the fastest cat on the plain

the most streamline and acute

with a slender frame.

By:  Tania. Rose. Esteban   10s

The Spanish Imperial Eagle

He glides, cavorts,

He turns and acutes a position,

He sees nothing, blatantly swerves,

The acrobat that he is;

Dives, shoots towards gravities pull; prey.

Lost; glides in a gradient towards the heavens,

gains height in fluctuations.

He is a gliding angel, across the moors

never stopping at a first glimpse,

of the target, his target.

A tinge of lavender, a splash of mauve

as he perches, claw on prey

he lands precariously on granite.

It is hard, but cooling

as is the victim within claws,

Lifeless; as so the moor seems

but not for the Spirit,

Shadowing our realms.

By:     Tania. Rose. Esteban   10s